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Comments to Semios-L

"Michael J. M. Maranda" :
TUT=Sisyphus?;
Wed, 12 Jun 1996 15:12:38 -0500

At 05:02 PM 6/10/96 -0400, you wrote:
>Katya's suggestion for searching via Semios-L is receiving the predictable
>negative responses. Katya's basic desire has merit, we all long for a
>tidier terminology.

But Esa and Terry both make the point, and I think it
>is right on the mark, that the terminological problems are indicative of
>deeper conceptual divisions. These divisions are likely irreconcilable.
>

> We would begin by
>drawing distinctions between terms that seem on the surface to be synonyms.
>We may find three situations:
>        1- Terms that really are synonyms
>        2- Terms that seem like synonyms but carry imnplications that are
>disimilar.
>        3- Groups of terms that are in family resemblance to each other as
>categories, despite triggering varietal denotations and connotations.
>
>In the meantime, since Katya has been so bold as to propose this hydra of a
>discussion: Katya, how about assembling clusters of terms that seem
>similar. Instead of just throwing them up here, perhaps you could begin by
>finding in researched sources, definitions of these terms. Let's see what
>that looks like.
>
>S
>_____________
>Steven Skaggs
>

I think that assembling clusters or even constellations of terms is a good
idea.  Noting "family resemblances" is a start.  I think we need a
compilation of summaries which will include the projects of the various
theoreticians who are introducing or making use of certain terms.  When one
theoretician uses the term sign as related specifically to spoken language,
while another uses sign in relation to aspects of human perception and
cognition generally, and still another uses signs in the more and more
general zoosemiotic and phytosemiotic, and physiosemiotic senses we get
beyond the point made in another post where "signs are recognized by their
users as signs".  As we try to limn the various projects we will have a
better view over why and how the specific clusters or constellations of
terms come together, and work together.

      "To cut with a clear mind: cut through the mind; clear the mirror."

       Visit the Enantiodrome: http://student-www.uchicago.edu/users/mjmarand/
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