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Terry Prewitt :
Re: TUT-wheredideverybodygo;
Tue, 25 Jun 1996 09:31:24 CDT

I too am wondering what happened to everyone, and I've not been able to
access Steve's stuff yet.  It strikes me that we could go in the direction
of discussing models, including structural models, as signs, and move
easily through some quick comparisons of Saussure, Peirce, Greimas, and
others.  I'm interested in the physical-dimensional connection between
such things as Greek and Hebrew story structures and the patterns of
stage construction for tragedy, temple rituals, etc.

Consider, for example, an example I use often to compare Judah/Tamar (Gen 38)
and the Sophocles cycle on Oedipus....

             Delphi                                     Enaim
               .                                          .
               .                                          .
               .                                          .
Thebes . .  Crossroads . .  Athens         Hirah's . . Entrance . . Timnah
                                           Village


Each of these stories (and the other stories in the Oedipus cycle) work around
four points.  A central one where some critical action takes place (Oedipus
kills father; Judah exchanges signs of his authority for sex with his daughter-
in-law).  In both identities are unknown, etc., etc.

In Antigone cycle, we shift to Thebes and then have Athens and the battlefield
stage right/left, and the tomb to the rear.  In Oedipus the King, the grove
is to the rear and the action takes place at a crossroad.

These patterns, which Levi-Strauss dealt with similarly, form a logical
group which operates through common principles.  I call each instance a
sign manifestation which pushes proforma associations in the interest of
producing a specific set of meanings/conclusions (the Peircean interpretant).

Most interesting is that the underlying principles of narrative are not
unique to Greek or Hebrew systems. Now if we deemphasize "structure" and
emphasize "discourse" or "unlimited semiosis" (especially in the instance
of play cycles or scriptural variations), then we move out of a structuralist
appreciation of the pattern and into a semiotic (not semiological) appreciation
of how meaning potentials are created.

More later. Terry

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